Articles from ‘Blondes’

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

Get To Know Hair Designer Esther!

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

We Love Color.Me!

colormeimage   In the cosmetology industry, it is important to stay knowledgeable on new technologies in hair color and hair products because innovations in ingredients and trends are ever-changing. To that end, Emerson Salon colorists have started to encounter more and more people with sensitivities and allergies to ammonia and PPD and have wanted to broach this issue for our clienteles.

What is PPD? Phenylenediamine (or PPD) is an organic compound used in hair dyes, as well as in rubber chemicals, textile dyes and pigments. Manufacturers like it because it has a low relative toxicity level, high temperature stability, and chemical and electrical resistance. In other words, it helps the new color stay on your hair despite numerous washings, dryings, and stylings. (from http://www.annmariegianni.com/)

Why is PPD “bad?”¬†The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) notes the following:

-PPD is potentially capable of causing multiple toxic effects following skin contact.

-Data from studies of both humans and animals are sufficient to demonstrate that PPD has potent skin-sensitizing properties.

-Several cases of contact dermatitis have been reported following occupational exposure to dyes containing the chemical.

-Studies have also identified the chemical as the third most common ingredient, after fragrances and preservatives, that can cause contact dermatitis from cosmetics (mainly skin-care products, hair preparations and colorants, and facial makeup products).

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We listened and have taken on the NEW color line Color.Me Kevin Murphy that is PPD FREE, Ammonia Free, Cruelty free and the ONLY PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) approved hair color line. We are so excited! If you look at the image to the left- you will see a color that prematurely faded on resistant grey hair with ammonia based permanent hair color. Then, observe the after as well as the ZERO fadeage after 3 weeks. WOW! What a difference! Check out more before and afters below!

 

 

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Here is some more information on its features+ ingredients:

  1. Color. Me is a performance driven line which means it is highly predictable and has minimal fade-age.
  2. It has a wonderful rose tea fragrance and barely any chemical smell at all because it is an MEA ammonia derivative and not actual ammonia.
  3. It causes next to no skin irritation and does not stain like ammonia based hair color.
  4.  It contains: shea butter, pomengranate, aloe vera, grapeseed oil, panthenol, almond oil (those with allergies to nuts may be sensitive,) coconut oil and most importantly, HONEY!
  5. The haircolor will never spoil or expire because of the sugars contained in the honey base.
  6. The line is designed for custom formulation and can be made semi, demi or permanent based on the artistic choices of the colorist as well as the desires of the client.
  7.  Has 3 types of bleaches: cream/oil based, ammonia based and non-ammonia lighteners give the professional the control to determine how much damage and lift is incurred on the hair.

  Want to have Color. Me by Kevin Murphy haircolor for your next all over color or balayage?

Book with Jason, D’Arcy, Lancer, or Esther on emersonsalon.com as they are loving the results as they continue to work with it and are delighted to try it on you! Read the rest of this entry

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Historic Trifecta 2015 Show

trifecta1trifecta This past weekend, most of our team (seen far right) attended a cosmetology show hosted and run by  distributor Salon Services.

The event was held at the wonderful Fremont Studios venue in Seattle for 2 whole days where hair designers from all over the Pacific Northwest were delighted by demonstrations in cut, color and style. The product companies that participated were Kevin Murphy, ColorProof, Keune, Moroccan Oil, Green Circle Salons and the author of the book, “Psy-cosmetology.”

The format was extremely interesting with Salon Services owners introducing and asking the CEO or Artistic Directors of each product company: What is the biggest challenge facing the salon industry now and in the future? and What is most important to you and your organization? Many said the diversion of salon products to internet and grocery stores is a huge challenge to professionals in the beauty industry. Our clients should be getting specific recommendations from us as professionals and purchasing with us in salon. At Emerson Salon, we try to carry brands that are rarely diverted and cost exactly the same if they buy it online or in salon.
trifectarosegold¬† ¬† ¬†The first company to show us some fabulous hair were some platform artists from Kevin Murphy. They are releasing their own color line called Color.Me in the US this coming September. They demonstrated some dimensional color effects on the model you see to the left¬†to execute some trendy Rose Gold haircolor with a cotton candy pink on the ends. Former NAHA winner, Tony Ricci also demonstrated some amazing editorial hair and even brought out a toy “Barbie” braider to create twisted braids in the hair (we do not recommend using this at home!.) One of the styles used colored scrap hair from the salon sprayed into cone shapes with Session Spray to make an elaborate “dinosaur” updo (see left below.) Another amazing style Tony did for us was using tight cornrows threaded with yak hair and then the sewing was cut to create a messy dread lock effect. (see right below)

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Next up was Moroccan Oil products with some amazing styles from THREE platform artists. This line uses a moisturizing argan nut dry oil as the key ingredient. They showed us some styles that could be easily achieved on clients as well as some extreme  looks executed with extra wigs and bun donuts. (see below)

 

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Then we were treated to a color demonstration from the Holland based company Keune. One of Emerson Salon’s co-owners, D’Arcy, volunteered to assist George Alderete briefly onstage. Look below for proof of her foiling magic on the model! (see left below)

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And a highlight of the event was getting to learn from Phillip Wilson from ColorProof who used to work alongside Vidal Sassoon many years ago. He is an exciting and dynamic personality and had the entire room of over 900 hairstylists in stitches. Here, he demonstrates how to create a classic graduated bob using a 2 comb technique instead of traditional layering with fingers and comb. It was amazing to see a totally different approach to the chic style!

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One of the most exciting part of the events was at the end of the second day. One of the vendors had to unfortunately drop out and as a replacement….we were treated to a HISTORIC COLLABORATION between many of the artistic directors and platform artists on some more hair models. Some stylists even worked on the same model simultaneously (see below!) The Salon Services owners Sydney and George were overwhelmed with emotion to see these wonderful hair designers coming together to give the gathered stylists a once in a lifetime treat! Usually, these individuals would never get to cross the aisle to work with another hair designer contracted with a rival product company. It was exciting and awe inspiring to see these successful artists joining to present us with this priceless opportunity!

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Education is SO important to a hair designer staying inspired and on top of their game. We learned a lot at Trifecta 2015 by Salon Services and are excited to let these ideas propel our work with clients into the stratosphere!

Book with one of our independently run hair designers by choosing one from a profile and contacting them directly for an appointment!

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

Olaplex Revolution

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In the cosmetology profession it is very important to stay current not only on trends and new application techniques but new innovations in chemical technology. There is a new system that is making hair colorists go NUTS! Its called OLAPLEX.

The system was designed by organic chemists who wanted to “solve problems” and the biggest challenge facing the haircoloring industry is the issue of breakage. More and more, people are asking for trends that demand getting the hair lighter, faster and with less breakage.

This is where Olaplex comes in. Hair is keratin proteins that are made up of disulfide bonds. These bonds are linked together and can get broken down during a lightening or haircoloring service. This system helps mend those bonds as they are broken so hair can accept more extreme changes with less likelihood of breakage. Its important to understand that it doesn’t guarantee against breakage but minimizes its probability.

Famous colorists from Tracy Cunningham, Guy Tang, Sally Hershberger and many others have been experimenting with the 3 step system and are loving the results.¬†One of our owners, D’Arcy Harrison, picked some up to try and was impressed with the results.

Kristen had Natural Level 5 hair and wanted to try the new extreme color ombre trend. In order to achieve the look she asked for it required lifting the hair over 3 levels through some very orange and gold stages. The goal was to get her hair to level 10 and 11 so the semi-permanent blue/violet and silver would show up appropriately.

NOTE: Whenever the hair is lightened or darkened 3 levels or more this is called “COLOR CORRECTIVE WORK.” Special care and expertise is required in order to achieve predictable results. Additionally, the service can cost more because of extra time and product used due to its corrective nature.

D’Arcy combined the It&lyHairfashion Easily Blond Bleach and 40 vol with the No. 1 Olaplex Bond Multiplier. She then applied the bleach in a feathered balayage technique and put Kristen under heat for 10 min.

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D’Arcy was amazed! The hair on the ends was a level 10 and the midshaft was a level 7/8. So D’Arcy mixed up some more bleach and olaplex and applied to the darker areas and let process for another 20 min. at air temperature. Then the hair was rinsed and the No.2 Bond Perfector was added at the shampoo bowl for 5-10min. The hair was then roughly dried and the Pravanna Vivids Blue and Violet were applied to the midshaft with Silver with a dash of Blue blended into the ends. Kristen was put under a medium heat dryer to drive in the semipermanent in order to make it last longer. The entire service was over 3 hours long. There is a No.3 to the Olaplex system for at home care following the service but Kristen opted for some Moroccan Oil Hydrating Shampoo, Conditioner and Weightless Hydrating Mask as the argan oil moisture helps hair stay flexible and not brittle.

Kristen did suffer some breakage on the last 2 inches of her hair ¬†(it was coiling and turning gummy) so D’Arcy did some strategic cutting and carving to eliminate the damage from the hair once dried and styled. But what is important is the hair got lighter faster, with less breakage and with more even results.

We will continue to keep experimenting in the salon with it as its very important to understand how to work with new products before using them on paying clients. If an individual indepependently run stylist  at Emerson Salon chooses to add this as an amenity it could be an add-on charge to any coloring service.

Want Olaplex at Emerson Salon? Tell us via our Twitter or Facebook pages!

Twitter: www.twitter.com/emersonsalon

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EmersonSalon

 

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Exciting Oscar’s Hair 2015

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We recently did a post about the conservative hair we recently saw on the Golden Globes Red Carpet. Now, we will point out the more daring looks of the Oscars parade of hair and gowns for the Academy Awards. We saw quite a bit of predictable hair but below we recount the ‘dos that excited us the most!

Our first prize for bold hair at the Oscars goes to Kelly Osbourne (left above.) She not only paired her recent shade of pale lilac with a great gown but she had a very interesting french twist on the center, top of her head. It was sleek and shiny and helped to seemingly elongate her height in the black high-low gown she chose.

Our second prize for bold hair goes to the inimitable Lady Gaga. She is known the world over for the beautiful lace front wigs she dons for press and performances and this is no exception. ¬†This wig’s color has a deep, ashy root subtly blended into a greyish platinum blond that is styled in loose waves. When trying to achieve similar looks to these we recommend a cocktail of Young.Again Immortelle Oil with Anti Gravity by Kevin Murphy. Apply to towel dried hair and blow dry 100% and then iron curl horizontally in big sections before using a boar bristle brush.

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We give honorable mentions to singer Rita Ora and actress Emma Stone. Rita has cropped her hair short and bleached and toned it a light, warm beige color. At the Golden Globes she wore her hair piece-y and funky but in this rendition she opted for a side part with a slick, wet look.  Very classic and refined comparatively to how we saw her new hair styled previously.

Emma has finally returned to the brilliant shade of deep copper red that we know and love her for after donning blond for the last couple years.  This shade of hair coupled with side pinning loose finger waves is perfect for pairing with her vintage inspired dress. Want your hair to stay like theirs? Use Session Spray by Kevin Murphy when finishing your style and it will hold all night whether you are relaxing or dancing the night away like the stars at the Oscar after parties!

Come meet ¬†with one of our awesome stylists and let them help you glow like these celebrities on the red carpet….Book with an independent Emerson stylist by clicking on their profile today!

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Your Hair’s Unique Chemistry

 

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At Emerson Salon, each of our experienced independent stylists work hard to give each individual client specific attention in order to deliver a successful service to a satisfied client. Inherently, hairstylists are people pleasers and will generally work very hard with you to help you manage your expectations as well as trying to give you your requested haircolor.  HOWEVER!

  • We must explain and impress upon you that coloring hair is a CHEMICAL PROCESS. Whether you are permanently or temporarily coloring your hair- there are always chemicals involved. Also, just because something says it is “All Natural”, “No Ammonia” or “All Organic” does not mean there aren’t naturally occurring chemicals in the ingredients that can cause damage or issues with your hair. Some ¬†“no ammonia” hair colors can actually do more to damage than and can create a false expectation in the user that they are doing something “healthy” for their hair. They use an ammonia derivative (MEA) that keeps aggressively working and working until it is shampooed out.

             (For example: You just got your hair highlighted a perfect neutral shade of blond and then you use a shampoo and conditioner with chamomile in it. Chamomile will enhance and give warm tones to your beautiful color and possibly ruin the work your professional stylist has achieved. Always take the advice from your stylist on the best professional products on your hair to help maintain your lovely look!)

  • Your hair and its follicle are fed nutrients from your blood and dermal system. Everything you do and everything you put into your body and/eat can contribute to how hair color interacts with your hair. Government agencies can¬†test your hair for drugs because drugs stay longer on your hair than in your blood system or cells.

¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†(For example: If you are on any or multiple medications or your diet has changed, make sure to tell your stylist. Medication buildup on your hair can make hair color grab cooler or may not completely cover grey. If you have been eating unhealthily, this also can change the health and fullness of your hair. Your stylist can adjust how they achieve your hair color based on this information and can help to avoid a “bad color” by doing so.)¬†(Another example: If you are gluten intolerant, PPD sensitive, or have skin sensitivities also tell your hairstylist so a skin issue doesn’t occur during your service. A skin ¬†patch test can always be done to see if the haircolor will be an issue.)

  • There are many people that go to years and years of school to understand organic chemistry and how ¬†chemicals interact with the body and hair. Hairstylists are not licensed chemists but are trained on how to achieve the most predictable results for what they are trying to achieve. They understand the hair’s BASIC chemistry and structure but do not have the in depth expertise to know how every chemical used on you might react with YOUR¬†body and hair’s unique chemisty. Unfortunately, the hair has its own ideas when it comes to that and it is a stylists job to make sure they prepare for every scenario. Just because your haircolor turns out unexpectedly also does not mean your colorist is imcompetent. Of course, if a foil has bled or the application method is wrong those are within the colorists control. Just understand, it is possible for the¬†chemicals to¬†behave outside of prediction and most colorists will work with you to rectify it.
  • The hair’s chemical history can be very complicated to work with especially if you have multiple color services on your hair. If you had old highlights, then covered them up with box color and then go to get new highlights- it is possible the hair’s damage will make it break or the color may react oddly due to the mixture of history on the hair.

The important lesson to learn is that you should work closely with whomever is coloring your hair. Give all the information you can think of to give and realize that a stylist hasn’t failed because 5% of your hair isn’t to expectation. Usually, if their is an adjustment needed a stylist will offer a “fix” up to 2 weeks after the initial service if you are using recommended shampoo and support products.

Its all part of forming a long term relationship with a colorist who’s ultimate goal is to make you happy and to create great word of mouth for new clients. Create a lasting relationship with one of our experienced independent stylists by contacting on of ours directly today!

 

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

“Saturday Afternoon” Hair at the Golden Globes 2015

This past Sunday night we watched the Hollywood Foreign Press bring all the celebrities together to award the best in TV and film. Its considered a precursor to the Oscars and sometimes forecasts this years winners.

The¬†Golden Globes usually help us hair¬†stylists¬†to see how fashion’s trends then and now come together in an elegant affair and on the red carpet. It can also help us steer our clients towards newer styles all year long. Here we review what we saw!

Below you will see examples of medium, medium long and long length hair in one of ¬†the signature styles of the night that we call,”Saturday Afternoon.” It looks done but not over done and would be a great and versatile “day into night” style for the everywoman. It incorporates an off center part with a soft and relaxed swoop of the front and soft, extra loose waves .You can achieve this by using a mousse like Body Builder by Kevin Murphy when blow drying roots for lift with your fingers. With Anti-Gravity as a foundation blow dried into the mid shaft to ends, use a medium heat curling iron with 1.5″ barrel. Curl horizontally in large sections ¬†and release. Brush the curls ¬†with a cushion brush once cooled and spray with a flexible hairspray.

naomiAmy_Adamsreese¬† Unfortunately, we did not see a lot of brave hairstyles at this awards show. Maybe they are saving their A-game for the Oscars. Regardless, we found it difficult to be inspired by any other looks because of how simple they were. They did not take ANY style risks. Many women parted their hair in the middle with predictable beach waves (example: Gwyneth Paltrow ) or slicked the middle parted hair into a bun or ponytail (example: Kate Hudson). Katie Holmes even donned a super long extensions ponytail that didn’t quite satisfy as a hairstyle. (see all below)

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¬† ¬† ¬† We were inspired by two showings on the red carpet, do not fret! We are a big fan of reinventing the classic bob as it can be classed up or funked up. Rosemund Pike of “Gone Girl,” and Zosia Mamet of, “Girls,” (seen below) both reinterpreted the bob for this event. Rosemund opted for an inverted angle, sleek ¬†traight texture and deeply parted on the side. It says chic and sophisticated and abandons the standard long hair known so well to the celebrity set. Zosia took the interpretation to color and sported a unique “grey beige” tone that refines the overtoned smoky¬†blond look into a cultivated style. ¬†She then combined it with a little “Saturday Afternoon” wave on the ends and created an accessible style with some funk. A great product to style hair with to achieve this look while also conditioning your hair simultaneously is Young.Again by Kevin Murphy. Its a weightless leave-in treatment oil infused with Immortelle to counteract the oxidization and ageing process.

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Although we did not see any courageous moves now, we still look forward to the upcoming awards season. Maybe the stylists in Hollywood have some secrets in their back pocket for later we do not know about!

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Sunsets on Blond

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Light and bright blond is super fashionable and seen on many music artists and performers (see Iggy Azalea above). The downsides are the constant maintenance to rid yourself of root growout but also the damage to your hair.  Unless you are already a medium light blond the process to get to a platinum blond are drying and cause frizz, loss of natural texture/curl and breakage.

Now that it’s fall, there are choices you can make to “reign” the blond in. One option is to color all over with a warm balanced gold ¬†(see left below) or balanced beige that is ¬†1 or 2 levels deeper (depending on your coloring.) This step down shade can fill in some of the damage and provide a healthier palette to color on later.

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Another choice to use for someone with ¬†darker natural root color is to transition with a balayaged lowlight (see right above.) This shouldin a shade that is 2-3 levels darker and incorporates enough soft warmth mixed with a cool beige or neutral to avoid any unfortunate fadeage. In lamens’ terms this means that color correction is used in the formulation. An over processed/light blond cannot be colored with the desired shade alone. The porosity is more likely to grab the blue or green if enough gold or warm brown¬†is not¬†used in mixing the custom shade.

This lowlight balayage service could be applied in¬†many ways to design your new dimensional blond to your preference. You could ask for lots of little pieces softly painted all over the head to mute the overall look of the light blond. ¬†Or you could ask to mute the base of your color with a more “ombre” effect where the mid shaft to ends stay light and the roots to midshaft are muted (see below.) This is more of a color correction and will need more time and color to achieve on a super light blond for reasons stated previously. Pricing may be shifted in regards to this away from a basic balayage due to the amount of color needed to achieve the effect. A step down color will need to be applied first to before¬†the desired medium dark brown shade ¬†is added. After this is achieved, the lighter dimension can be toned a medium gold to lessen the contrast with the base color.

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Feeling sunbleached and need to change your blond? Check out our independent stylists’ profiles and contact them specifically today!

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

What Is Color Correction?

Color Correction is one of the most technically challenging services to accomplish as a colorist. ¬†Many factors are involved when executing this service including hair’s ¬†chemical history, length, porosity and density.

Color correction can be time consuming- it can take anywhere from 2 -5 hours depending on desired result. We recommend always booking a consultation prior to booking a color correction in order for your hair to be analyzed and assessed by your stylist for your desired shade. Also, each of our stylists are independent so it will be important to inquire as to what color line they intend to use. Some of our stylists use It&ly Hairfashion that is 98% naturally derived and has tons of essential oils and botanicals that assist in conditioning the hair.   It is very important that the stylist knows the color line they work with very well in addition to a working knowledge of color theory and the color wheel.

For example: To counteract orange a colorist may use a blue/ash tone to cancel out warmth as it is opposite orange on the color wheel.

Color Correction follows under the following three categories:

  • Deepening hair color more than 3 shades all over
  • Lightening artificial pigment and/or box color all over
  • Lightening hair color more than 3 shades all over
  • Correcting undesirable color on compromised, damaged or previously colored hair

When deepening the hair color more than 3 shades:  An example of this is when a client would like to take their lighter blond hair to a darker shade like dark chocolate or natural black (like seen on Katy Perry above.)  Taking hair to the desired shade on overly porous or damaged hair that has been lightened previously without a trained professional is not advised .

In order to achieve consistent color saturation that won’t fade unevenly or in odd tones you must add the warmth back in first. Example: A light blond will need to be stepped down with copper before applying the desired chestnut brown. If hair is extremely damaged it may be necessary to come back in a month to redeposit the desired shade because of the damage on the hair and not due to the inability of the colorist. Sometimes the hairs’ damage supersedes accurate coloring techniques.

Lightening artificial pigment or¬†Lightening hair color more than 3 shades all over: When getting your hair bleached it is important to know why it is necessary. Color does not lift artificial color and getting more than 3 or 4 levels of lift on natural hair is usually not possible using ¬†lifting hair color. Bleach is a different chemical process than permanent oxidative haircolor. It uses a higher ammonia content and chemical “explosions” in the hair’s structure to break up the pigment living inside. Then the hair can be toned to counteract or enhance the raw tone in the hair that has been exposed. (Above you can see the 7 stages of bleaching that shows the shades bleached hair moves through.) A lot of the time clients want to avoid the red orange ¬†in the hair ¬†(also known as “brassiness”) and a blue or blue green based color can be used to neutralize it.

We also advise color correction lighter clients to be prepared for dry, frizzy hair to emerge after bleaching. On certain hair types this can cause breakage if there is a complicated color history to the hair.

Regarding bleaching through artificial hair color with old highlights underneath: This will cause “compounded damage,” which means there is a higher risk of breakage in addition to unpredictable color results. If you covered up old highlights with dark box¬†color it is very hard to remove because box color uses cheaper pigments . Cheaper pigments are very challenging ¬†to strip out and may need more processing time or repeated bleaching sessions.

****Correcting undesirable color on compromised, damaged or previously colored hair can also be corrective. ****

Damaged hair is porous and can “suck up” colors too dark, too brown, too cool, and will have a risk of fadeage. Hair that is porous has lots of holes in the hair’s structure +cuticle. This condition can make it EXTREMELY difficult to get a guaranteed or desirable result.

When receiving color correction we recommend the following:

Use appropriate professional level, paraben +sulfate free, color safe shampoos and conditioners. Drugstore brands contain 85% water, waxes, parabens, and although may say they are color safe they do not work as effectively. You invested in a new color- so make sure to maintain it with recommended products! We are loving Moroccan Oil Hydrating Shampoo and Conditioner as they make even the most damaged hair behave for you  better.

Bring home a deep conditioning treatment like Moroccan Oil Restorative Mask to help rehab your hair so the color will stay longer in addition to repairing damage with argan oil and a little protein.

Use a good leave in product like Moroccan Oil  or Moroccan Oil Light. The antioxidants and U.V. inhibitor properties will help protect your new color from fadeage and also acts as a great thermal protectant during heat styling.

Lookin’ to dramatically change your haircolor? Book with an Emerson Salon Stylist ¬†by contacting them specifically for a consult!

 

 

 

 

Monday, September 15th, 2014

Want Balayage?

At Emerson Salon, our stylists aim to create looks that not only look fabulous on you but will also fit in with your coloring, style and maintenance needs. Balayage is a great way for a fashion conscious and low maintenance  guy or gal to have a customized color without having to come into the salon every 8 weeks for touch ups. We have seen many different types of balayage emerge in the last few years since Drew Barrymore introduced it on the red carpet to the mass market in the US. It showed  her dark brown roots blended into bright gold ends 5 years ago but balayage has been around since before that. We are here to educate you on what balayage is and what the different types are.

What is Balayage? Balayage is a french term describing the application method where highlights and/or lowlights are,”swept in.” This application is different than traditional dimensional foiling where the color desired is applied in foils close to the scalp. Although foiling can be a great way to get highlights, it can emphasize a harsh grow out line as the natural color of your hair grows ¬†in contrast to the foiled color.

Balayage can be designed so that the growout is minimized due the soft effect it creates on the hair (even if you get a dramatically lighter highlight.) Pricing with balayage can vary based on stylist, desired effect, history of hair, density and length but generally starts at around $100 and can go up from there. A great way to use balayage is on darker haircolor to “break up” ¬†the darkness slowly over time. This is a great alternative to all over color correction which can be challenging and pricey.

There are a few different methods of applying balayage. Some stylists choose to backcomb or tease the root and then apply the color or bleach¬†in a feathered affect to the sections of hair in the desired effect. Other stylists use cotton to lift up the root and apply the desired result on thin strips of hair and then add clear plastic wrap over the top to keep heat during processing. Both methods are equally effective, it just depends on the preference and training of the stylist. If you are looking for a dramatic difference on the ends, your stylist may choose to use foil to trap the heat so its warmth is consistent on the section for even lightening. What are the different types of balayage? Let’s break it down into subtle, moderate, dramatic, ombre ¬†and dip dye balayage.

***Please be advised: If your hair is colored, your hair must be bleached in order to create a lighter effect. Color does not lift color. Discuss your hair’s color history with your stylist to achieve optimized results and learn about damage risks during bleaching*******

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Subtle Balayage

Subtle balayage tends to be a highlight or lowlight that is between 1-3 levels ¬†difference (see above)¬†than the natural level of your hair. This gives a feeling of “sun kissed” highlights like you have been in the sun for awhile. This balayage can have the longest time between touchups if it is not heavily applied close to the root. This is great for working moms, busy students, and for the first time balayage client.

 

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Moderate Balayage

A moderate balayage will be 3-4 levels difference than your natural color (see above) and can be focused on the midshaft to ends,stroked into the front or used closer to the root. This type of balayage might need more maintenance depending on how close the highlight or lowlight is applied to the root. We recommend getting a full balayage with this to start and then schedule a partial balayage to touch it up every 3 months.

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Dramatic Balayage

This balayage uses highlights and/or lowlights that are 4-6 levels different on the mid shaft to ends and are usually not applied close to the root due to the contrast that will occur during grow out. If it is applied closer to the root it can shorten time between maintenance visits and is considerd to be a “dramatic” change if starting on darker hair. Be prepared for your friends to say,”WOW! Thats really different than what you had before!” This can be a great way to go from ¬†highlights all over your head to something that will need less maintenance. Its recommended to get regular trims ¬†and conditioning treatments on longer hair that has dramatic balayage because of the possible damage that is incurred in creating the lighter effect. Your hair may also need to be re-toned on a semi-regular basis to keep it shiny and its color saturation even.

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Ombre Balayage

An “ombre” balayage is the type where you see a subtle and gradual blend of the darker roots into the dramatically lighter ends that are at least 3-4 levels difference than the natural root color. (see above) This is different than dramatic balayage that utilizes strips of color “popping out” of the base color. Generally, this is an application that requires bleach and can cause breakage or frizz so make sure to use Moroccan Oil to keep them moisturized and protected from heat damage. This application means you don’t have to come in for a retouch for 3-5 months but you may need a retone of the ends due to its damage+porosity every 2 mos.

dipdye

Dip Dye Balayage

Dip Dye Balayage is basically a bleach and tone ombre balayage with a vivid semi-permanent shade applied instead of a natural looking toner. This type of balayage is super fun and we have seen a lot of it at music festivals and around Capitol Hill, Seattle. You can choose to do pink, teal, purple, orange, neon blue, whatever! At Emerson we have a few different type of semi permanents. If you are looking to keep the chosen hue for awhile we can use Pravanna Vivids with heat to make it last 5-8 weeks. If you want to change up the color regularly we also carry Fabuloso Pro by Evo which is based on fabric technology and will eventually completely shampoo out of your hair in 14-16 shampoos so you can select a different color when you like!

Whats the best way to style a balayage or ombre haircolor? When styling balayage it is recommended to either have a soft round brush blowout or to add soft waves and/or curls as it helps to emphasize the movement in the hair and your new dimensional color.

Excited to try on  some balayage? We are excited to work with you on it! Select a stylist from their profile and contact them directly for an appointment!