Articles from ‘Corrective Color’

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

We Love Color.Me!

colormeimage   In the cosmetology industry, it is important to stay knowledgeable on new technologies in hair color and hair products because innovations in ingredients and trends are ever-changing. To that end, Emerson Salon colorists have started to encounter more and more people with sensitivities and allergies to ammonia and PPD and have wanted to broach this issue for our clienteles.

What is PPD? Phenylenediamine (or PPD) is an organic compound used in hair dyes, as well as in rubber chemicals, textile dyes and pigments. Manufacturers like it because it has a low relative toxicity level, high temperature stability, and chemical and electrical resistance. In other words, it helps the new color stay on your hair despite numerous washings, dryings, and stylings. (from http://www.annmariegianni.com/)

Why is PPD “bad?”¬†The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) notes the following:

-PPD is potentially capable of causing multiple toxic effects following skin contact.

-Data from studies of both humans and animals are sufficient to demonstrate that PPD has potent skin-sensitizing properties.

-Several cases of contact dermatitis have been reported following occupational exposure to dyes containing the chemical.

-Studies have also identified the chemical as the third most common ingredient, after fragrances and preservatives, that can cause contact dermatitis from cosmetics (mainly skin-care products, hair preparations and colorants, and facial makeup products).

colorme5

 

 

We listened and have taken on the NEW color line Color.Me Kevin Murphy that is PPD FREE, Ammonia Free, Cruelty free and the ONLY PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) approved hair color line. We are so excited! If you look at the image to the left- you will see a color that prematurely faded on resistant grey hair with ammonia based permanent hair color. Then, observe the after as well as the ZERO fadeage after 3 weeks. WOW! What a difference! Check out more before and afters below!

 

 

colorme6colorme4 colorme2

Here is some more information on its features+ ingredients:

  1. Color. Me is a performance driven line which means it is highly predictable and has minimal fade-age.
  2. It has a wonderful rose tea fragrance and barely any chemical smell at all because it is an MEA ammonia derivative and not actual ammonia.
  3. It causes next to no skin irritation and does not stain like ammonia based hair color.
  4.  It contains: shea butter, pomengranate, aloe vera, grapeseed oil, panthenol, almond oil (those with allergies to nuts may be sensitive,) coconut oil and most importantly, HONEY!
  5. The haircolor will never spoil or expire because of the sugars contained in the honey base.
  6. The line is designed for custom formulation and can be made semi, demi or permanent based on the artistic choices of the colorist as well as the desires of the client.
  7.  Has 3 types of bleaches: cream/oil based, ammonia based and non-ammonia lighteners give the professional the control to determine how much damage and lift is incurred on the hair.

  Want to have Color. Me by Kevin Murphy haircolor for your next all over color or balayage?

Book with Jason, D’Arcy, Lancer, or Esther on emersonsalon.com as they are loving the results as they continue to work with it and are delighted to try it on you! Read the rest of this entry

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

Salon Confessional #2

It seems our salon fans love hearing about the inside scoop from stylists within our salon-

so we are doing another SALON CONFESSIONAL!

 

true-confessions

Why doesn’t my fashion color last past a month?

Many ladies are coming in wanting the trendy purple, teal, pale pinks, lilac or grey “granny hair.” What this entails is bleaching the hair to the lightest possible blond in order for a pastel shade to show up. This may mean that it cannot be achieved in one session depending on what history is already on your hair. Generally, pastel and vivid extreme colors are semi-permanent. Semi-permanents are direct dyes ¬†(meaning they sit on top of the hair) and last between 10-16 shampoos -but may be even less if it is a pastel shade. Pastels have no guaranteed longevity and are completely temporary. It is not the stylist’s “fault” if it doesn’t last as long as you would prefer. The nature of the service can be extremely damaging even on the healthiest of hair and can compromise the hairs’ ability to hold color in addition to the nature of the semi-permanent shade used to create the selected hue. Using appropriate sulfate free, professional level, color safe products assists in keeping the color but does not guarantee how long it will last.

Why is my hair so dry and damaged after I get highlights?

  • Bleach is an entirely different chemical process than coloring your hair. Bleach aggressively breaks up the hair’s pigment with chemical explosions and results in breaking apart the hair’s structure. Then, we can go in with a semi, demi or permanent color to create the tonality we wish to make that will assist also in holding the hair’s structure together. Hair can become frizzy and porous with the potential of breakage when bleached. Previously colored hair must be bleached in order for it to become lighter so if you have dark color on your hair, the only choice for a stylist is to use bleach.

Why are men’s haircut prices less than women’s longer hair prices?

  • ¬†One of our stylists, Michael Simons has great insight on this with his over 20 years ¬†of experience. “I tell clients that the amount of $ and time I put into training to execute women’s and longer haircuts is extensively more than for men’s shorter haircuts.” With men’s haircuts you are looking at a span of 4-6 weeks between cuts. With women a bad haircut could take years to grow out so the work entailed must be top notch.
  • D’Arcy, co-owner of Emerson Salon also adds,”I take into account the amount of time and product (shampoo, conditioner + styling product) used in the service. The more hair left on the head the higher the price of the haircut. Also, the price is also based on the training I received for the service. For example, I spent a few years learning advanced color knowledge and haircutting techniques. For men’s cutting I spent 4-6 months learning how to use clippers appropriately. “

What’s the biggest piece of advice for a client ¬†in your chair?

  • Michael Simons says that clients need to feel the liberty to speak up in the chair. “I take it as a compliment when people are able to tell me something they do not like about their cut or color in the chair. You trust me as a professional to take the feedback and try to rectify the problem.”
  • No stylist wants you to be unhappy with your hair. Creating a style you are satisfied with needs to come from a space that feels safe for you to communicate. Also, getting defensive about our work does not create long lasting clientele and most hair professionals are able to take the critique with poise and grace. So tell us how you really feel (respectfully of course!) We can handle it!

Have we dispelled some myths for you?

We hope so! We are here to make sure our clients understand what is entailed for their hair services at Emerson Salon. We always recommend researching a new style or hair color before embarking on a new look! Ask your stylist lots of questions in the consultation about pricing, recommended care and maintenance and get the best possible service for you and your budget.

Book with an Emerson Salon independent stylist through their profile today!

go to www.emersonsalon.com and select a stylist to book online!

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

Olaplex Revolution

olaplex1

In the cosmetology profession it is very important to stay current not only on trends and new application techniques but new innovations in chemical technology. There is a new system that is making hair colorists go NUTS! Its called OLAPLEX.

The system was designed by organic chemists who wanted to “solve problems” and the biggest challenge facing the haircoloring industry is the issue of breakage. More and more, people are asking for trends that demand getting the hair lighter, faster and with less breakage.

This is where Olaplex comes in. Hair is keratin proteins that are made up of disulfide bonds. These bonds are linked together and can get broken down during a lightening or haircoloring service. This system helps mend those bonds as they are broken so hair can accept more extreme changes with less likelihood of breakage. Its important to understand that it doesn’t guarantee against breakage but minimizes its probability.

Famous colorists from Tracy Cunningham, Guy Tang, Sally Hershberger and many others have been experimenting with the 3 step system and are loving the results.¬†One of our owners, D’Arcy Harrison, picked some up to try and was impressed with the results.

Kristen had Natural Level 5 hair and wanted to try the new extreme color ombre trend. In order to achieve the look she asked for it required lifting the hair over 3 levels through some very orange and gold stages. The goal was to get her hair to level 10 and 11 so the semi-permanent blue/violet and silver would show up appropriately.

NOTE: Whenever the hair is lightened or darkened 3 levels or more this is called “COLOR CORRECTIVE WORK.” Special care and expertise is required in order to achieve predictable results. Additionally, the service can cost more because of extra time and product used due to its corrective nature.

D’Arcy combined the It&lyHairfashion Easily Blond Bleach and 40 vol with the No. 1 Olaplex Bond Multiplier. She then applied the bleach in a feathered balayage technique and put Kristen under heat for 10 min.

kristenbeforekristen after

D’Arcy was amazed! The hair on the ends was a level 10 and the midshaft was a level 7/8. So D’Arcy mixed up some more bleach and olaplex and applied to the darker areas and let process for another 20 min. at air temperature. Then the hair was rinsed and the No.2 Bond Perfector was added at the shampoo bowl for 5-10min. The hair was then roughly dried and the Pravanna Vivids Blue and Violet were applied to the midshaft with Silver with a dash of Blue blended into the ends. Kristen was put under a medium heat dryer to drive in the semipermanent in order to make it last longer. The entire service was over 3 hours long. There is a No.3 to the Olaplex system for at home care following the service but Kristen opted for some Moroccan Oil Hydrating Shampoo, Conditioner and Weightless Hydrating Mask as the argan oil moisture helps hair stay flexible and not brittle.

Kristen did suffer some breakage on the last 2 inches of her hair ¬†(it was coiling and turning gummy) so D’Arcy did some strategic cutting and carving to eliminate the damage from the hair once dried and styled. But what is important is the hair got lighter faster, with less breakage and with more even results.

We will continue to keep experimenting in the salon with it as its very important to understand how to work with new products before using them on paying clients. If an individual indepependently run stylist  at Emerson Salon chooses to add this as an amenity it could be an add-on charge to any coloring service.

Want Olaplex at Emerson Salon? Tell us via our Twitter or Facebook pages!

Twitter: www.twitter.com/emersonsalon

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EmersonSalon

 

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Your Hair’s Unique Chemistry

 

Hair Folliclemeds

At Emerson Salon, each of our experienced independent stylists work hard to give each individual client specific attention in order to deliver a successful service to a satisfied client. Inherently, hairstylists are people pleasers and will generally work very hard with you to help you manage your expectations as well as trying to give you your requested haircolor.  HOWEVER!

  • We must explain and impress upon you that coloring hair is a CHEMICAL PROCESS. Whether you are permanently or temporarily coloring your hair- there are always chemicals involved. Also, just because something says it is “All Natural”, “No Ammonia” or “All Organic” does not mean there aren’t naturally occurring chemicals in the ingredients that can cause damage or issues with your hair. Some ¬†“no ammonia” hair colors can actually do more to damage than and can create a false expectation in the user that they are doing something “healthy” for their hair. They use an ammonia derivative (MEA) that keeps aggressively working and working until it is shampooed out.

             (For example: You just got your hair highlighted a perfect neutral shade of blond and then you use a shampoo and conditioner with chamomile in it. Chamomile will enhance and give warm tones to your beautiful color and possibly ruin the work your professional stylist has achieved. Always take the advice from your stylist on the best professional products on your hair to help maintain your lovely look!)

  • Your hair and its follicle are fed nutrients from your blood and dermal system. Everything you do and everything you put into your body and/eat can contribute to how hair color interacts with your hair. Government agencies can¬†test your hair for drugs because drugs stay longer on your hair than in your blood system or cells.

¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†(For example: If you are on any or multiple medications or your diet has changed, make sure to tell your stylist. Medication buildup on your hair can make hair color grab cooler or may not completely cover grey. If you have been eating unhealthily, this also can change the health and fullness of your hair. Your stylist can adjust how they achieve your hair color based on this information and can help to avoid a “bad color” by doing so.)¬†(Another example: If you are gluten intolerant, PPD sensitive, or have skin sensitivities also tell your hairstylist so a skin issue doesn’t occur during your service. A skin ¬†patch test can always be done to see if the haircolor will be an issue.)

  • There are many people that go to years and years of school to understand organic chemistry and how ¬†chemicals interact with the body and hair. Hairstylists are not licensed chemists but are trained on how to achieve the most predictable results for what they are trying to achieve. They understand the hair’s BASIC chemistry and structure but do not have the in depth expertise to know how every chemical used on you might react with YOUR¬†body and hair’s unique chemisty. Unfortunately, the hair has its own ideas when it comes to that and it is a stylists job to make sure they prepare for every scenario. Just because your haircolor turns out unexpectedly also does not mean your colorist is imcompetent. Of course, if a foil has bled or the application method is wrong those are within the colorists control. Just understand, it is possible for the¬†chemicals to¬†behave outside of prediction and most colorists will work with you to rectify it.
  • The hair’s chemical history can be very complicated to work with especially if you have multiple color services on your hair. If you had old highlights, then covered them up with box color and then go to get new highlights- it is possible the hair’s damage will make it break or the color may react oddly due to the mixture of history on the hair.

The important lesson to learn is that you should work closely with whomever is coloring your hair. Give all the information you can think of to give and realize that a stylist hasn’t failed because 5% of your hair isn’t to expectation. Usually, if their is an adjustment needed a stylist will offer a “fix” up to 2 weeks after the initial service if you are using recommended shampoo and support products.

Its all part of forming a long term relationship with a colorist who’s ultimate goal is to make you happy and to create great word of mouth for new clients. Create a lasting relationship with one of our experienced independent stylists by contacting on of ours directly today!

 

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Sunsets on Blond

iggy1

Light and bright blond is super fashionable and seen on many music artists and performers (see Iggy Azalea above). The downsides are the constant maintenance to rid yourself of root growout but also the damage to your hair.  Unless you are already a medium light blond the process to get to a platinum blond are drying and cause frizz, loss of natural texture/curl and breakage.

Now that it’s fall, there are choices you can make to “reign” the blond in. One option is to color all over with a warm balanced gold ¬†(see left below) or balanced beige that is ¬†1 or 2 levels deeper (depending on your coloring.) This step down shade can fill in some of the damage and provide a healthier palette to color on later.

goldblonddimensional-blonde-highlights

Another choice to use for someone with ¬†darker natural root color is to transition with a balayaged lowlight (see right above.) This shouldin a shade that is 2-3 levels darker and incorporates enough soft warmth mixed with a cool beige or neutral to avoid any unfortunate fadeage. In lamens’ terms this means that color correction is used in the formulation. An over processed/light blond cannot be colored with the desired shade alone. The porosity is more likely to grab the blue or green if enough gold or warm brown¬†is not¬†used in mixing the custom shade.

This lowlight balayage service could be applied in¬†many ways to design your new dimensional blond to your preference. You could ask for lots of little pieces softly painted all over the head to mute the overall look of the light blond. ¬†Or you could ask to mute the base of your color with a more “ombre” effect where the mid shaft to ends stay light and the roots to midshaft are muted (see below.) This is more of a color correction and will need more time and color to achieve on a super light blond for reasons stated previously. Pricing may be shifted in regards to this away from a basic balayage due to the amount of color needed to achieve the effect. A step down color will need to be applied first to before¬†the desired medium dark brown shade ¬†is added. After this is achieved, the lighter dimension can be toned a medium gold to lessen the contrast with the base color.

blond ombre

Feeling sunbleached and need to change your blond? Check out our independent stylists’ profiles and contact them specifically today!

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

What Is Color Correction?

Color Correction is one of the most technically challenging services to accomplish as a colorist. ¬†Many factors are involved when executing this service including hair’s ¬†chemical history, length, porosity and density.

Color correction can be time consuming- it can take anywhere from 2 -5 hours depending on desired result. We recommend always booking a consultation prior to booking a color correction in order for your hair to be analyzed and assessed by your stylist for your desired shade. Also, each of our stylists are independent so it will be important to inquire as to what color line they intend to use. Some of our stylists use It&ly Hairfashion that is 98% naturally derived and has tons of essential oils and botanicals that assist in conditioning the hair.   It is very important that the stylist knows the color line they work with very well in addition to a working knowledge of color theory and the color wheel.

For example: To counteract orange a colorist may use a blue/ash tone to cancel out warmth as it is opposite orange on the color wheel.

Color Correction follows under the following three categories:

  • Deepening hair color more than 3 shades all over
  • Lightening artificial pigment and/or box color all over
  • Lightening hair color more than 3 shades all over
  • Correcting undesirable color on compromised, damaged or previously colored hair

When deepening the hair color more than 3 shades:  An example of this is when a client would like to take their lighter blond hair to a darker shade like dark chocolate or natural black (like seen on Katy Perry above.)  Taking hair to the desired shade on overly porous or damaged hair that has been lightened previously without a trained professional is not advised .

In order to achieve consistent color saturation that won’t fade unevenly or in odd tones you must add the warmth back in first. Example: A light blond will need to be stepped down with copper before applying the desired chestnut brown. If hair is extremely damaged it may be necessary to come back in a month to redeposit the desired shade because of the damage on the hair and not due to the inability of the colorist. Sometimes the hairs’ damage supersedes accurate coloring techniques.

Lightening artificial pigment or¬†Lightening hair color more than 3 shades all over: When getting your hair bleached it is important to know why it is necessary. Color does not lift artificial color and getting more than 3 or 4 levels of lift on natural hair is usually not possible using ¬†lifting hair color. Bleach is a different chemical process than permanent oxidative haircolor. It uses a higher ammonia content and chemical “explosions” in the hair’s structure to break up the pigment living inside. Then the hair can be toned to counteract or enhance the raw tone in the hair that has been exposed. (Above you can see the 7 stages of bleaching that shows the shades bleached hair moves through.) A lot of the time clients want to avoid the red orange ¬†in the hair ¬†(also known as “brassiness”) and a blue or blue green based color can be used to neutralize it.

We also advise color correction lighter clients to be prepared for dry, frizzy hair to emerge after bleaching. On certain hair types this can cause breakage if there is a complicated color history to the hair.

Regarding bleaching through artificial hair color with old highlights underneath: This will cause “compounded damage,” which means there is a higher risk of breakage in addition to unpredictable color results. If you covered up old highlights with dark box¬†color it is very hard to remove because box color uses cheaper pigments . Cheaper pigments are very challenging ¬†to strip out and may need more processing time or repeated bleaching sessions.

****Correcting undesirable color on compromised, damaged or previously colored hair can also be corrective. ****

Damaged hair is porous and can “suck up” colors too dark, too brown, too cool, and will have a risk of fadeage. Hair that is porous has lots of holes in the hair’s structure +cuticle. This condition can make it EXTREMELY difficult to get a guaranteed or desirable result.

When receiving color correction we recommend the following:

Use appropriate professional level, paraben +sulfate free, color safe shampoos and conditioners. Drugstore brands contain 85% water, waxes, parabens, and although may say they are color safe they do not work as effectively. You invested in a new color- so make sure to maintain it with recommended products! We are loving Moroccan Oil Hydrating Shampoo and Conditioner as they make even the most damaged hair behave for you  better.

Bring home a deep conditioning treatment like Moroccan Oil Restorative Mask to help rehab your hair so the color will stay longer in addition to repairing damage with argan oil and a little protein.

Use a good leave in product like Moroccan Oil  or Moroccan Oil Light. The antioxidants and U.V. inhibitor properties will help protect your new color from fadeage and also acts as a great thermal protectant during heat styling.

Lookin’ to dramatically change your haircolor? Book with an Emerson Salon Stylist ¬†by contacting them specifically for a consult!