Articles from ‘Hair Repair’

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

NEW! Colour Angels from Kevin Murphy


 NEW! COLOUR ANGELS from Kevin Murphy

If you have blond or pre-lightened hair to a level 9, 10 0r 11 (yellow or lighter) you can play around with these supremely conditioning glosses for your tresses.

“Meet our newest blondetourage: COLOURING.ANGELS. Our four new colour-enhancing treatments add a lip-gloss like shine and tone to the hair to enhance existing tones, neutralise unwanted tones, and improve colour longevity without building up on the hair. Packed with hair-loving ingredients such as Olive Leaf Extract, Green Tea Extract, and Grape Seed Oil, our newest ANGELS moisturise your hair while improving flexibility and adding protection for your locks.”

There are 4 in the series:

Blonde, Autumn, Crystal, Clear and Sugared.

See the key below for its tone enhancing hues and counteracting colors.

 


“Our AUTUMN.ANGEL adds a soft, apricot rosé hue for natural, rose gold, or apricot-toned blondes, while our COOL.ANGEL magnifies cool, ash shades while removing stubborn orange hues from the hair. Use our SUGARED.ANGEL for a creamy, vanilla beige to mute unwanted warmth and create luminous toffee tones, or stick to our CRYSTAL.ANGEL to enhance your existing colour while illuminating your strands with this unique clear, top coat.

Following our cult-favourite BLONDE.ANGEL treatment, our four newest ANGELS fit right into our BLONDE regimen for your at-home colour care to moisturise, enhance, restore shine, and refresh coloured or uncoloured hair. To use, simply cleanse the hair with the WASH of your choice and apply your desired COLOURING.ANGEL, leaving for 3-5 minutes before rinsing. You can use your ANGEL as often as you wish, as the pigments are designed to never build up on your hair!”

We are so excited to play with these and use it for maintaining our fabulous color services!

ON SALE NOW!

www.emersonsalon.com

Friday, July 14th, 2017

Direct Dye Dilemmas

 

We’ve had an upsurge of clients coming in with trendy, vibrant hair colors in their hair, and wanting to remove them. The vibrant colors (like those in the image below) are direct dyes. It is not as easy as just applying one step and getting what you want (unfortunately we can do great things with hair -but there are limits.) The problem with semi permanents like these is they are not guaranteed to last for longer than 10 shampoos and may be less with pastel hues or on bleach damaged or compromised hair. Ironically, if you want to remove them they can be a real bother!

kristen afterbluehairteal

pasteltealpastelss

Direct dyes do not require oxidation or developer for the color to stain the hair. In areas where the hair is more porous, this type of color will show greater intensity. Caution must be exercised when utilizing a semi-permanent haircolor on porous hair; it can stain the hair permanently.” (From the American Board of Certified Colorists haircolorist.com)

 

Sometimes, using strong bleaches will make the direct dye go further into the hair shaft and lodge even more stubbornly inside the hair. There are ways to strategically fade or remove the direct dye but having it professionally done is COLOR CORRECTIVE.

(Color correction work includes working with removing artificial pigment, coloring hair with previous color history, or deepening or lightening more than 3 levels. )

There is NO GUARANTEE in removing direct dyes. It may take multiple sessions to achieve- it may even not be possible to completely remove without cutting it out. If its a blue, green, or teal-like hue, it can be VERY difficult to remove.  

If you want to help the fade along you can do the following:

  • Use dish or liquid  laundry detergent with harsh sulfates to aggressively emulsify out the color
  •  Add 50o mg of crushed Vitamin C and/or Baking Soda to your professional level sulfate free shampoo (leave on for 45 minutes and rinse+condition)
  • Soak your hair in bath salts for 40 minutes then shampoo and condition

If you are asking a stylist to remove it, we recommend asking for a mild bleach+ clarifying shampoo with Olaplex treatment at the shampoo bowl. That way you are removing the color mildly, with a little insurance against breakage. This can remove some of the color and then the remainder can be bleached out once 90% faded.

****If the above methods do not work****

-Take a break, and deep condition your hair twice a week before attempting to remove it again.

And remember…we may be able to do magic with haircolor, but we have no magic wand for every hair situation!

Hairstylists do their absolute best to counsel you on the risks of certain services as well as trying to make you happy…

Have more questions?

Book a color consultation with one of our independent hair designers at www.emersonsalon.com today!

Wednesday, January 6th, 2016

Hair Resolutions 2016

 

Are you making changes for 2016? Well, we have some ideas to help create and maintain beautiful hair in the New Year for you!

heattoolsMake a resolution to be smarter when using your heat tools: 

-Use heat tools that use ceramic or tourmaline plates that help maintain your cuticle layer with controls that allow you to adjust the temperature. An on or off switch shows you no indication as to what level of damage you may be doing to your hair. We recommend digital heat tools that show you specifically what temperature range you are in.

-Always use a thermal protectant. We hear from a lot of clients that they are curling or flat ironing without a barrier to heat damage. Doing this can cause holes in your outer hair structure and make it difficult for your hair to retain quality moisture  and haircolor in your hair. We recommend MoroccanOil’s Original Treatment or Nourishing Oil By Loma. They are dry oils, are conditioning and will prevent high heat from burning your cuticle layer.

-Control the temperature for your hair type. There is no need to use over 350 degrees on fine, delicate hair. Thicker hair needs 400-450 degrees.

-If your hair is fine or chemically damaged DO NOT use the flatiron to curl your ends. It creates too much stress on the hair and will make it break 5x faster.

trimDedicate yourself to regular hair trims, color refreshes, and deep conditioning.

-Hair trims are your best defense against split ends. Even if you are growing your hair out longer it is a good idea to keep the ends freshened up so the oldest hair is not prone to breakage. For short to medium hair schedule every 4-7 weeks. For medium to long hair schedule every 6-10 weeks.

-Does your color get dull and murky looking after about 6-8 weeks? Schedule a conditioning color refresh with your colorist. Some shades (like semi permanents, reds and pastels) fade quicker and need more maintenance to keep them looking shiny and saturated. If you recently received a bleach and tone it will be necessary to keep it toned regularly to battle brassiness or maintain tonal stability.

-You can schedule a deep conditioning treatment with a hair designer or you can do one at home. In salon treatments tend to last longer because some of them use heat to penetrate to the structure inside the hair. We recommend MoroccanOil’s Restorative Hair Masque or Intense Hydrating Masque. These are easy to do at home once a week for dry or damaged hair in 5-15 minutes. Using moisture or moisture with protein will assist in keeping your hair’s health and manageability. (Some stylists use a disulfide mending OLAPLEX in salon as a treatment. Inquire at Emerson Salon with D’Arcy  for this service.)

Make sure to listen to your hair professional’s recommendations

on professional products for your hair type.

km

mo -Stylists work with many, many heads of hair a day and know which products will work best for your hair type and styling regimen. So listen and learn!

-Products sold from a professional salon are the highest quality, do not contain extra water and are more concentrated than other store brands. Don’t trust Amazon, Bartell’s, CVS or Costco for your hair products. They could be expired, contain high levels of bacteria or be counterfeit.

-Your stylist makes the recommendations that will help you recreate the look done inside the salon. Reward them by giving them the sale and not an online outlet or store. Your stylist has your hair’s health and style as a high priority in order for you to become or stay a returning customer.

-If a product doesn’t work for you, ask if you can exchange the product for one that does. No sense in keeping a product that you do not like the smell or isn’t optimal for you.

Your “Hair Resolutions” in 2016 can be upheld if you follow these easy steps. And remember- your hair is an investment! The more you put into your hair, the happier you will be with it!

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

What the heck is “Bronde?”

New hair looks get new names. Some ladies in our chair are still learning what balayage and ombre is-

balayage: hand painted highlights  ombre: lighter highlights concentrated on the ends

The newest terms that baffles potential clients minds are the terms “bronde” or “ecaille.”

brondebronde2

“BRONDE”

BRONDE means any soft balayage technique that blends a medium or dark brown base

into a medium/dark gold or warm/medium beige highlight.

The ‘Br’ is the brown and the ‘onde’ is the blonde. The contrast is moderate and tends to grow out very naturally for either black, dark brown or medium brown naturally colored hair. In the salon, we compare these colors to shades of coffee with its balanced, rich tones.

 This is a great technique to drop down a dramatic blond balayage or ombre to help add shine+ reflection to hair that is trashed  from too much bleaching or sun fadeage. The color will fill in the negative spaces and plump up the structure to help the hair to style and look better.

This look tends to slowly graduate the dark color from roots to the mid shaft and ends – creating a subtle ombre or “sombre” effect. The difference in contrast between the darker shade should ounly be 1-3 levels only.

tortoiseshell“ECAILLE”

ECAILLE or “tortoise shell” combines a medium or dark brown base with soft  strips of medium to light gold balayage highlights in the front and mid-shaft+ends.

The effect is different than bronde. The highlights can be closer to the scalp  and give an overall, defined, dimensional look. This look is great for naturally colored medium brown or ash colored hair. The base color can be bumped up a level and the highlights painted in after. The grow out is a little less soft than bronde and will require the highlights to be maintained every 10 weeks instead of the normal soft balayage growout of 12-14 weeks. The effect will only subtly ombre on the last couple inches of the hair.

Want to try one of these looks on after  a summer of faded haircolor?

Book with one of our independent stylists through their profile at www.emersonsalon.com

“For Style That Works!”